If you’ve ever suffered from a concussion then you will understand that it is a painful, sometimes distressing, and upsetting condition to have. Of course, over the course of a couple of days, after being checked out, you should be fine and completely recovered, however at the time you could be forgiven for feeling a little worried about what has happened to you.

Concussion shouldn’t be overlooked in seriousness, because it is in fact a brain injury, although the least serious type there is. Because of this fact, it’s important to seek medical help after a head injury, to assess your level of injury and to get a firm diagnosis, before beginning any treatment methods.

Continue reading

Rare disorders are often very under-reported, but are often some of the most debilitating and difficult conditions to live with. Some of these problems actually have no cure, because of their rareness or complications, and the only way to deal with them is to either a) live with it, or b) manage it.

Obviously managing a problem is always better than simply living with it, and in the case of Meniere’s Disease, there are now several ways you can manage your condition and reduce the severe effects this condition can cause.

Meniere’s Disease is rare, and is a condition which affects the inner ear, causing symptoms such as vertigo, tinnitus, a feeling of pressure in the ear, sensitivity to noise or sound distortion, and even resulting in permanent hearing loss in severe cases. Put simply, Meniere’s Disease is no picnic.

Attacks tend to come on suddenly with no warning, which can cause severe upset to a sufferer’s life, sometimes resulting in anxiety and depression, because of the impact it has on their day to day function. Symptom attacks can last around two to three hours or even a day or two before symptoms disappear completely, and can range in severity.

Here at Eastern Brain Centre we appreciate the upsetting nature of Meniere’s Disease, and we see and treat people experiencing this disorder. There is no cure for Meniere’s Disease, so it is down to management, however research suggests that vestibular rehabilitation is effective in reducing attacks and severity of symptoms(1), when used in conjunction with other lifestyle changes.

Meniere’s Disease is thought to affect women slightly more commonly than men, and the age bracket between 20-60 are affected mostly. There is no solid evidence on what causes Meniere’s Disease, however it is thought to be a fluid pressure issue in the inner ear.  The fact there is no solid cure, and no evidence on what truly causes it from person to person, really adds fuel to the fire of how difficult Meniere’s Disease can be to live with if left unmanaged.

The good news is that with vestibular rehabilitation, people often find relief. Seek help for these unpleasant and sometimes disturbing symptoms of Meniere’s Disease, and call the practice now on 03 8652 1628 to arrange an appointment to discuss your particular situation and symptoms.

Just as you are individual as a person, every case of Meniere’s Disease is just as individual, and you can be assured of an individually-based, holistic management plan to address your particular circumstances.

 

 

(1) McDonnell, M.N. and S.L. Hillier, Vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2015. 1: p. CD005397.

If you’re a regular sufferer of bouts of dizziness, then you don’t need anyone to tell you how upsetting and sometimes how debilitating the symptoms can be. It’s not simply a case of feeling a little bit unsteady, or a momentary feeling of the world whizzing by, it’s much more than that, and in severe cases it can leave a sufferer house-bound and prone to bouts of depression and anxiety(1,2,3).

There are many different types of dizziness you can experience, but a common and upsetting one is called Persistent Postural Perceptual Dizziness, or PPPD for short.

This particular form of dizziness leaves sufferers open to a range of symptoms, such as rocking or swaying, dizziness without vertigo which lasts for three months or more, nausea, vomiting, and generally feeling completely unsteady in the space you’re in. Symptoms of PPPD are often felt on a daily basis, with little respite, and are usually worse with certain exacerbations, such as an upright posture, movement of the head and body, or exposure to an environment with a lot of movement, e.g. a car or train journey.

Continue reading

When you have vertigo, your brain gets confused. You know you’re standing still, but you may suddenly feel as though you’re spinning, or that the world is spinning around you. Vertigo may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, sweating, fatigue, or a headache. There are a number of causes of vertigo, most of which originate in the nervous system.

Causes of vertigo include:

  • Problems with the peripheral nervous system, including benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere’s disease, labyrinthitis, and acute vestibular neuronitis.
  • Problems with the central nervous system, including cervicogenic vertigo, migraines, multiple sclerosis, and acoustic neuroma,
  • Side effects of medications, such as antidepressants, diuretics, sedatives, hypnotics, antibiotics, antineoplastics, anticonvulsants, antihypertensives, cold medicines, and aspirin,
  • Symptoms of certain conditions, including diabetes, high triglycerides, hypoglycemia, hypothyroidism, high or low blood pressure, and food allergies and sensitivities.
  • Trauma, especially head trauma

Continue reading

For many years there has been an air of confusion around the after effects of concussion, and indeed a debate on whether there were any lingering effects at all. Many studies have attempted to answer this question, and to what degree, however a recent study has shed some important and interesting light on the debate, and has opened the door to more targeted treatment for patients suffering from depression and anxiety following a traumatic brain injury. These results could also yield fantastic opportunities to further understand the complex nature of these very common conditions.

For anyone who sustains this type of injury and undergoes concussion treatment, there is always the concern that additional side effects will occur further down the road, however it seems that sustaining a traumatic brain injury, or concussion, could actually cause depression or anxiety symptoms at a later date.

Continue reading

Vestibular neuritis is the third most common cause of vertigo. We often see it and its consequences in our vertigo and dizziness practice.  To raise awareness of this condition we have created this infographic. You are welcome to use this infographic on your site, provided you follow the directions below.

Vestibular Neuritis Infographic

Use This Infographic on Your Site!

You may use the graphic above on your site, however, the license we grant to you requires that you properly and correctly attribute the work to us with a link back to our website by using the following embed code.

Embed Code

Copy and paste the code below to use this infographic on your website.

<img src="http://braincentre.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Vestibular-neuritis-infographic.png" width="1254" height="4321"> 
<p>Infographic about Vestibular Neuritis - by the team at 
<a href="http://braincentre.com.au/free-infographic-vestibular-neuritis"> 
Eastern Brain Centre, focusing on treatment of vertigo, click here to view the original.
</a></p>

Thumbnail

Vestibular-neuritis-infographic-thumbnail

Meniere’s Disease is a common cause of vertigo and dizziness.  We often see this condition in our practice and research suggests that it can often be helped with the vestibular rehabilitation therapies.  You are welcome to use this infographic on your site, provided you follow the directions below.

Meniere's Disease Infographic

Use This Infographic on Your Site!

You may use the graphic above on your site, however, the license we grant to you requires that you properly and correctly attribute the work to us with a link back to our website by using the following embed code.

Embed Code

Copy and paste the code below to use this infographic on your website.

<img src="http://braincentre.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/menieres-disease-infographic.png" width="1250" height="5483"> 
<p>Infographic about Meniere's Disease - by the team at 
<a href="http://braincentre.com.au/free-infographic-menieres-disease-aka-endolymphatic-hydrops"> 
Eastern Brain Centre, focusing on treatment of vertigo, click here to view the original.
</a></p>

Thumbnail

Meniere's Disease Infographic

Free Infographic: BPPV – Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

BPPV is a common cause of vertigo and is one of the main types of vertigo we see in our clinic. We created this infographic to shed light on this debilitating condition.  You can use this infographic on your site if you follow the instructions below.

Infographic about BPPV - benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

Use This Image Free on Your Site!

You can use this infographic on your website, however, the license we grant to you requires that you properly and correctly attribute the work to us with a link back to our website by using the following embed code.

Embed Code

Copy and paste the code below to use this infographic on your website.

<img src="http://www.braincentre.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/bppv-vertigo-infographic.png" width="540"> 
<p>Infographic about BPPV - benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - by the team at 
<a href="http://braincentre.com.au/free-infographic-bppv-benign-paroxysmal-positional-vertigo"> 
Eastern Brain Centre, focusing on treatment of vertigo, click here to view the original.
</a></p>

Facebook thumbnail:

Thumbnail of Infographic about BPPV - benign paroxysmal positional vertigo